Honda Brake Repair Salt Lake City: GT Automotive

Honda Brake Problems: Salt Lake City

Having brake system problems, and need Honda brake repair in Salt Lake City?  Tim and Dave at GT Automotive, in this auto repair video, explain why your Honda needs brake repair more often than expected.

Brake issues on Honda cars and SUVs are common, so do not get too alarmed or incensed. With transverse mounted engines, front wheel drive and all-wheel drive axles, he relatively small brake surface area of Honda brake rotors, and the weather extremes in Utah, faster wear and tear on Honda brakes and braking systems are to be expected.

As noted on car repair sites like Honda Problems, brake repair issues are always at the top of the list for Honda vehicle owners. In 2010, reported by The New York Times, Honda agreed to settle a class-action suit involving premature rear brake pad wear on about 750,000 late model Accords and Acura TSXs, in which brakes were wearing out more than twice as fast as they should.

Whereas your Honda may not fall into a class action lawsuit category because your brakes need to be replaced sooner than you expected, here are eight tips that will prove helpful in extending the life of your brakes:

8 Tips For Extended Brake Life On Your Honda:

1. Slowly brake to a stop. Stops from high speed are the mortal enemy of brakes. And a little more speed hurts more than you can imagine. Stopping from 65 mph rather than 55 forces the brakes to dissipate 33% more energy.
2.Keep your left foot off of the brake pedal. Enough said, right? Also, it’ll be easier to resist unnecessary brake taps:
3. Where possible, coast to a stop.Coasting is a surprisingly easy way to get rid of a lot of brake-killing speed. For example, if you know you’ll have to stop at the end of a freeway off-ramp, coasting from 70 down to 50 before you brake will significantly reduce brake wear. Ypou won’t lose that much time, but you will save on brake wear-and that saves you money in the long run.
4. Anticipate-before you brake. Memorize places where other drivers inappropriately slow down. For example-hills, freeway bends, hairpin turns. Often, you’ll have to coast down to their pace. Plan ahead and you will have used less brakes and gas.  Look beyond the next traffic signal and you’ll be able to correctly time stoplights, and notice traffic backing up at the 2nd, 3rd or 4th traffic light.
5. Don’t brake just because the guy in front does. Many times, the first driver touched their brake for no good reason. It’ll take practice to learn to coast when others brake inappropriately, but it’s worth it.

6. Inspect brakes regularly-before they hit “metal-to-metal”. If metal touches metal (brake pads on brake rotors), putting off the brake job to save money now becomes more expensive. Since Utah safety inspection requires checking brake wear every year on cars over 7 years old, older cars have a natural built-in time for brake inspection. On cars newer than 7 years-where in Utah brakes are checked every 2 years-a good time to inspect your brakes is when you have your tires rotated.

8. Flush and replace your brake fluid regularly, periodically. Flushing the brake fluid will make the internal brake parts last longer, and the brakes perform better. Brake fluid naturally attracts water, and -over time and repeated braking-this moisture gets hotter at lower tempaeratures (due to the water content now in the brake fluid). Moisture also accelerates brake part corrosion, which ruins critical rubber seals.
9. Get the right brake pad material for your Honda. Today’s brake pads are extremely complex. They may contain a dozen or more components, and are designed for specific uses. As Honda trained technicians, we can match your desires with the right brakes.

Honda Auto Repairs: Salt Lake City

Looking for a Honda auto repair shop in Salt Lake City to look at your car repair problem?

Whatever Honda model car you drive-Accord, Civic, CR-V, Pilot, Odyssey, Ridgeline, Element, Fit, NSX-our skilled technicians and up to date technology allows us to service and repair Honda cars with the ease and efficiency your vehicle deserves.

Since 1980, GT Automotive and our ASE certified and factory trained Honda and Acura technicians have been serving Honda car owners in the Salt Lake Valley for all their vehicle repair needs. Call us today, 801-302-0912, about servicing and repairing your Honda or Acura in Salt Lake City.

Honda Repair Salt Lake City

Maintain your Honda car with regular maintenance at GT Automotive

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Auto Repair Salt Lake City, Auto Repair Sandy, GT Automotive South Jordan


Our commitment to provide superior auto repair service includes providing a work environment that is comfortable and enjoyable for our employees.  As you see on this auto repair video of our facilities and employees, GT Automotive in South Jordan is a great place to work. View our employee comments about working at GT Automotive.

We will inspect and care for your car or truck to help keep you safely on the road. GT Automotive has ASE certified technicians for car repairs for all make and model vehicles. We can inspect your car during our Express Oil change, and help keep your vehicle operating safely in all seasons. Call us today, 801-302-0912, about auto repairs and service in Salt Lake City.

Auto Repair Salt Lake City, Car Repair Sandy

Auto Repair Salt Lake City: 6 Safe Driving Tips To Avoid Injury and Accidents

Auto Repair Sandy

Follow These 6 Safe Driving Tips

1. Concentrate-Avoid “Distracted Driving”:
Driving while talking on your cell phone, and  driving while texting has now become the major distractions while driving. Do you need more incentive to stop texting and/or holding phones while driving? Try these numbers: 10, 75, 375…

Ten People Die every day in the U.S. : According to Distraction.gov, the U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration website on distracted driving, there were 3,328 people who were killed in distracted driving accidents in 2012. White male drivers-ages 25 to 64-made up the highest percentage of drivers involved in these fatalities.

Can You Afford To Lose $75-$375?? Currently, Utah (one of 41 states), the District of Columbia, Guam, and the U.S. Virgin Islands have bans on texting for all drivers. 12 states ban drivers from using handheld cell phones at all. Some states only have bans on cell phones for novice drivers, while other states — such as our neighbor state Montana — currently do not have any bans regarding distracted driving.

2. Expect Driver Mistakes: “Watch Out For The Other Guy”

We have met the enemy and he is us. You can never rely on what the other driver will do. Think back to all the mistakes you’ve made while driving over the years. Think ahead to the ones you know you will make in the future. All the other drivers are just like us! Don’t trust them! While you are driving, keep a wary eye on the other guy and leave yourself plenty of room. Anticipate the mistakes he might make and be ready for them. Eventually, he will! Because he’s just like us! When you are driving on “autopilot,” you have turned control of your vehicle over to those other drivers – you are at their mercy. Their fate is your fate.If you are too trusting, you are relying on that other driver for your safety. Is he worthy of that trust? Every few seconds, some drivers in this country find out this is a poor bet. Maybe some of those other drivers are returning from a beer festival! Maybe they just lost a job, or worse, a loved one. The other driver might be an 11-year-old who found Dad’s keys. Approach driving with the idea that every other driver is an unpredictable menace and out to get you. Most collisions occur when the “other guy” does something we don’t expect, or when we do something they don’t expect.If you accept that everyone makes driving errors, the next step is to drive with a wary attitude. Be careful of approaching red lights, because you know a light by itself never stopped anyone. Watch out for folks getting ready to pull out from parking beside the road. Look for gaps in lines of traffic which might be the result of someone pausing to let another vehicle cross in front of them. (I’ve personally witnessed three or four collisions in the past ten years that happened just this way). There are others: failure to signal a lane change or turn, or tailgating someone when they are poking along because they need to make a turn—a turn they suddenly WILL make when they see it at the last second. You can think of dozens of others. Be alert to the possibilities and have a stra – See more at: http://www.roadtripamerica.com/forum/content.php?8-Defensive-Driving-Don-t-Trust-Nobody&s=6d66a5f04389036c809aeff41ad21ab4#sthash.Hqr0j2UJ.dpuf
We have met the enemy and he is us. You can never rely on what the other driver will do. Think back to all the mistakes you’ve made while driving over the years. Think ahead to the ones you know you will make in the future. All the other drivers are just like us! Don’t trust them! While you are driving, keep a wary eye on the other guy and leave yourself plenty of room. Anticipate the mistakes he might make and be ready for them. Eventually, he will! Because he’s just like us! When you are driving on “autopilot,” you have turned control of your vehicle over to those other drivers – you are at their mercy. Their fate is your fate.If you are too trusting, you are relying on that other driver for your safety. Is he worthy of that trust? Every few seconds, some drivers in this country find out this is a poor bet. Maybe some of those other drivers are returning from a beer festival! Maybe they just lost a job, or worse, a loved one. The other driver might be an 11-year-old who found Dad’s keys. Approach driving with the idea that every other driver is an unpredictable menace and out to get you. Most collisions occur when the “other guy” does something we don’t expect, or when we do something they don’t expect.If you accept that everyone makes driving errors, the next step is to drive with a wary attitude. Be careful of approaching red lights, because you know a light by itself never stopped anyone. Watch out for folks getting ready to pull out from parking beside the road. Look for gaps in lines of traffic which might be the result of someone pausing to let another vehicle cross in front of them. (I’ve personally witnessed three or four collisions in the past ten years that happened just this way). There are others: failure to signal a lane change or turn, or tailgating someone when they are poking along because they need to make a turn—a turn they suddenly WILL make when they see it at the last second. You can think of dozens of others. Be alert to the possibilities and have a stra – See more at: http://www.roadtripamerica.com/forum/content.php?8-Defensive-Driving-Don-t-Trust-Nobody&s=6d66a5f04389036c809aeff41ad21ab4#sthash.Hqr0j2UJ.dpuf

Never rely that the other driver will make the right move. While you are driving, keep an eye on the other guy, and leave yourself plenty of room. Anticipate the mistakes he or she might make-and be ready for them. Because, eventually they will! You have to approach driving with the idea that every other driver is a “mayhem” menace-out to get you. Remember-most collisions occur when the “other guy” does something we don’t expect (or when we do something they don’t expect!)

“Nobody ever yielded their way into a collision.” Think about it. If you are in doubt about who has the right of way, give it away. The other guy may be wrong, but you can end up hurt or dead. We often say no one HAS the right-of-way until it is yielded to them. (Keep in mind I’m talking defensive driving practices, not traffic law.) Right of way rules are often misunderstood, and there are situations where the rules may not be clear to everyone. If there is uncertainty about which vehicle should have the right of way, give the other guy the road. When it comes to driving safely, it’s not the principle, but the outcome, that counts. – See more at: http://www.roadtripamerica.com/forum/content.php?10-Defensive-Driving-Tip-Yield-Anyway#sthash.of3HNzWD.dpuf
  • Approach stop signs and red lights with care, and look both ways-even when your signal turns green (like my driving instructor told me “Does a red light or stop sign REALLY stop anybody?”).
  • Watch out for cars ready to pull out into the road (expect they DON’T really see you!!)
  • Expect that everyone has a blind spot—and it is your car!!
  • Beware of gaps in lines of traffic-someone may be letting another vehicle (or pedestrian) cross in front of them.
Auto Repair Sandy

Yield, and Use Your Car Safety Devices

3. Yield-waiting is worth the wait!

According to the National Highway Patrol Board, the #1 cause of accidents is….FAILURE TO YIELD. “Nobody ever yielded their way into a collision” makes a great point: If you are in doubt about who has the right of way, give it away. The other guy may be wrong, but do you want to be “dead right”?? If there is doubt about which vehicle should have the right of way, give the other guy the road. When it comes to driving safely, it’s not the principle, but the outcome, that counts. And, even if you know you have the right of way, see Tip #2 above….

4. Drive A Reasonable Speed:

This means sometimes driving below the speed limit. Remember the slick, icy, snowy, windy, dark, congested Utah roads-any of these conditions may make the “speed limit” much too fast for safe driving.

Driving at a higher than reasonable speed increases your risk in two ways:

  • It cuts your reaction time.
  • It takes farther to stop.

Are the risks really worth a few minutes?

5. Know and Use Your Vehicle Safety Devices:

  • Seat Belts-need we say any more about seat belts??
  • Child safety seats and restraints. State laws vary on what constitutes a legal child seat. There are different types of seats to use depending on the age, weight and size of the child. Be aware and use the correct type for your child. Buckle the seat into the center, rear seat position where there is increased protection from side impacts. A child seat should not be in the front seat, especially if there is an air bag system installed; the air bag impact can hurt or kill a child in an incorrectly installed safety seat. (see bullet point : “Air Bags“.)
  • ABS (Anti-Lock Brake System) Brakes. ABS brakes prevent uncontrolled skids during hard braking. We will discuss this in our ABS video, which we will post the week of January 20, 2013.
  • Air Bags. Air bags open with a certain amount of violence. They are timed so as you are thrown forward, they expand to fill the intervening space to prevent your impact on harder surfaces. You can be injured by an air bag – but the injuries will usually be minor compared to those you’d experience otherwise. Sit as far back from the steering wheel as you can while still comfortably reaching all the necessary controls, and grip the wheel correctly.
  • High Beam Headlights (switch back and forth from regular to high beam-drivers, pedestrians, and animals will take notice-of you!
  • Car Horn (not slamming on the horn, but tap GENTLY on the horn-they will still hear that!). Light taps of our car horn-and light horn taps more often during driving-actually do more good than harm.

6. Service Your Vehicle Regularly. Safe Driving includes proper vehicle performance, which is why good car care maintenance is important.

  • Windshield wipers;
  • Headlights;
  • Tires and alignments;
  • Brakes;
  • Cooling and heating system checks (includes radiators, belts, hoses);

Inspecting, checking, servicing and/or replacing all of the above regularly helps prevent driving mishaps due to vehicle failure.

Take the time to inspect and care for your car or truck, so the harsh Utah winter does not impact your safety while driving. GT Automotive has ASE certified technicians for car repairs for all make and model vehicles. We can inspect your car during our Express Oil change, and help keep your vehicle operating safely in all seasons. Call us today, 801-302-0912, about auto repairs and service in Salt Lake City.

Audi Auto Repair Salt Lake City:Brake Repairs,ABS Brakes Salt Lake City

With the Utah winter snow falling on roads in Salt Lake City and along the Wasatch Front, safe braking on snowy and icy roads is a concern that is significantly reduced with a properly functioning anti-lock brake system (called ABS) on your car. ABS systems have been installed in most vehicles since the late 1980’s.

Your car’s Anti-Lock Brake System (ABS) is explained in plain language by Tim, owner of GT Automotive in South Jordan. Whether you drive an Audi (the car in this video) or any car 10 years old or newer, your brakes are equipped with an anti-lock system on either front or rear, or both sets of axles. See what you should know about your brake service in this video.

Your antilock brake system is a safe and effective braking system, allowing you to maintain directional stability and control while braking and steering, and reduce stopping distances during emergency braking situation, particularly on wet, slippery, icy or snowy road surfaces.

Here are a few frequently asked questions about your ABS Brake system, as posted on the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) web page:

What is ABS? Why Is ABS important?
An antilock braking system works with the regular or foundation brakes on your vehicle. ABS simply keeps your base brakes from locking up. In vehicles not equipped with ABS, the driver can manually pump the brakes to prevent wheel lockup. In vehicles equipped with ABS, the driver’s foot remains firmly on the brake pedal, allowing the system to automatically pump the brakes.

When your brakes lock up on wet, slippery, icy or snowy roads (or during a panic stop), you lose steering control, and your vehicle can spin. Rear wheel ABS prevents wheel lockup so that your car stays in a straight line. If your car has ABS control on all four wheels, you also keep steering control. If you have steering control, it is possible to avoid a crash by steering around hazards if a complete stop cannot be accomplished in time.

Will I notice anything when the ABS is working?
In many vehicles, drivers may experience a rapid pulsation of the brake pedal–almost as if the brakes are pushing back at you. Sometimes the pedal could suddenly drop. Also, the valves in the ABS controller may make a noise that sounds like grinding or buzzing. In some cars you may feel a slight vibration–this means the ABS is working. It is important NOT to take your foot off the brake pedal when you hear noise or feel pulsations, but instead continue to apply firm pressure.

Does ABS change the way I should use the brakes?
You should not pump your brakes if you have ABS. Just hold your foot firmly on the brakes pedal and remember that you can still steer.

How does ABS work?
What ABS does is similar to a person pumping the brakes. It automatically changes the pressure in your car’s brake lines to maintain maximum brake performance just short of locking up the wheels. ABS does this very rapidly with electronics.

Do cars with ABS stop more quickly than cars without?

ABS is designed to help the driver maintain control of the vehicle during emergency braking situations, not make the car stop more quickly. ABS may shorten stopping distances on wet or slippery roads and many systems will shorten stopping distances on dry roads. On very soft surfaces, such as loose gravel or unpacked snow, an ABS system may actually lengthen stopping distances. In wet or slippery conditions, you should still make sure you drive carefully, always keep a safe distance behind the vehicle in front of you, and maintain a speed consistent with the road conditions.

Brakes are among the most important systems in your car. They are not just parts-they are your safety system. Whether you drive an Audi, VW, Subaru, Toyota, Honda, Chevy, Ford, Dodge, car or truck-there’s a lot riding on your brakes. Understanding how they work will help you take the best care possible, meaning safe driving, and avoiding accidents.

For  Audi service and maintenance needs, GT Automotive has ASE certified technicians for all Audi model vehicles. Call us today, 801-302-0912, about servicing and/or repairing your Audi in Salt Lake City.

ABS Brakes For Controlled Steering & Braking On Slippery, Icy Roads Salt Lake City Utah

ABS Brakes For Controlled Steering & Braking On Slippery, Icy Roads